Displaying items by tag: Imprint Films

Well, yesterday was kind of a big day in terms of industry news, but as it happens, there have been quite a lot of interesting 4K Ultra HD and Blu-ray announcements in the last 24 hours too!

But before we get to those, we have a few more new disc reviews for you...

I’ve just taken a look at John Sturges’ Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957) in 4K Ultra HD from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, as well as Ron Maxwell’s cult classic Little Darlings (1980) in 4K UHD from Vinegar Syndrome’s new Cinématographe Films label.

Stephen has turned in his thoughts on Nia DaCosta’s The Marvels (2023) in 4K Ultra HD from Marvel and Disney, along with Yoshimitsu Banno’s Godzilla vs. Hedorah (1971) on 4K UHD (sans English subs) from Toho Studios in Japan.

Dennis has given Ted Kotcheff’s Split Image (1982) a look on Blu-ray from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, along with Vincente Minnelli’s Madame Bovary (1949) on Blu-ray from the Warner Archive Collection.

And Stuart has reviewed Andrew V. McLaglen’s The Devil’s Brigade (1968) on Blu-ray from Kino Lorber Studio Classics and Steve Zaillian’s Searching for Bobby Fischer (1993) on Blu-ray from Imprint Films.

Many more reviews are forthcoming, including Footloose, Conan the Destroyer, and Justice League: Crisis on Infinite Earths – Part One in 4K, so be sure to keep your eyes peeled for them.

Now then... in terns of title announcements, Paramount’s just dropped a couple of big ones starting with confirmation of a title we’ve mentioned here at The Bits recently: Alex Proyas’ The Crow (1994) officially streets on 4K Ultra HD and 4K Steelbook on 5/7. The 4K disc will include Dolby Vision and HDR10 high dynamic range. [Read on here...]

Published in My Two Cents

Today’s post starts with three new disc reviews, including...

Stuart’s take on the Film Focus: George Peppard box set from Imprint, which includes John Guillermin’s P.J. (1968), George Schaefer’s Pendulum (1969), Sam Wanamaker’s The Executioner (1970), and Richard T. Heffron’s Newman’s Law (1974).

Dennis’ look at Val Guest’s Assignment K (1968), also new on Blu-ray from Imprint.

And finally, Stephen’s thoughts on Vincente Minnelli and Busby Berkeley’s Cabin in the Sky (1943) on Blu-ray from the Warner Archive Collection.

Note that we have lots more new disc reviews on the way, so be sure to watch for them. Also here at The Bits today, we’ve posted a significant update of our 4K Ultra HD Release List with lots of new 4K UHD titles and Amazon links.

And for our Patreon supporters, we’ve recently shared our thoughts on Ron Moore’s Battlestar Galactica and how well the series holds up some fifteen years after it ended its run on the Sci-Fi Channel, along with some preliminary commentary on changes that are brewing within the home entertainment industry, as well as Stephen’s thoughts on the ethics of film alteration and the challenges in determining how films should look on Blu-ray and especially 4K. Supporting The Bits on Patreon is a great way to help us continue our work in service of physical media, and we surely do appreciate it. [Read on here...]

Published in My Two Cents

All right, we’ve got a few interesting items for you today, including some new release news and more. But first, more new disc reviews...

Tim has taken a look at Peter Walker’s House of the Long Shadows (1983) on Blu-ray from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, a Cannon Films cult title featuring no less than Vincent Price, Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing, and John Carradine. Tim has also reviewed Umbrella Entertainment’s wide-release 4K UHD edition of Andrzej Zulawski’s Possession (1981) in 4K Ultra HD, and he’s updated his review of the Collector’s Edition 4K too.

Dennis has taken a look at Daphné Baiwir’s King on Screen (2022) documentary on the film adaptations of author Stephen King. That comes to Blu-ray by way of Dark Star Pictures and Vinegar Syndrome.

And Stephen has reviewed another Toho kaiju classic in 4K Ultra HD, this time Ishirō Honda’s Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster (1964). Once again, being a Japanese import title it does not include English subtitles, but there’s a work around for that.

Before we get to the announcement news this afternoon, a number of online retailers have begun taking pre-orders on the 3/12 4K Ultra HD release of James Cameron’s The Abyss (1989), True Lies (1994), and Aliens (1986), with the odd exception of Amazon. The links are up on Amazon (click on the title links in the previous sentence, and we’ll including them on the cover artwork below) but for whatever reason they haven’t been made live yet. I don’t know if this is a Disney oversight, or an Amazon oversight, but we’ll keep our eyes on the situation and update you when they go live. [Read on here...]

Published in My Two Cents

Whew! Yesterday was a big day, was it not? I was up all night prior to the announcement, formatting the post for 7 AM Pacific release, and man was it ever good to finally share that! I’ve been sitting on some of that information for months, so I’m very glad to finally be able to speak about it openly. And after thirteen years, it’s damn good to finally confirm that those James Cameron titles are indeed coming to 4K and Blu-ray at long last.

We have more new disc reviews to share today here at The Bits, and there’s more release news today as well. But first, I wanted to let you all know that I’ve just done a new blog post over on Patreon: My Two Cents on the New Abyss Trailer, and the Subject of DNR and Film Grain. It’s based on an impromptu Q&A thread I was involved in over on Twitter/X this morning, but with some added detail that will definitely be of interest to fans of these James Cameron films in remastered 4K. So if you’re a backer of The Bits’ new Patreon—and if you’re not, you should be, as we really need and appreciate the support!—I think you’ll certainly enjoy that. But for the rest of you, rest assured: Much of the substance of that post will be shared here on The Bits website when we review The Abyss, True Lies, Aliens, and Titanic in 4K, first on Digital in a few weeks and then in a few months on actual 4K UHD disc.

Now then, speaking of reviews... Stephen has posted his thoughts on Roger Spottiswoode’s The Best of Times (1986) on Blu-ray from Kino Lorber Studio Classics.

Dennis has reviewed Éric Gravel’s Full Time (2021) on Blu-ray from Music Box Films and Vinegar Syndrome, as well as Jared Moshe’s Aporia (2023) on Blu-ray from Well Go USA.

Stuart has weighed in with his take on Roy Del Ruth’s Du Barry Was a Lady (1943) on Blu-ray from the Warner Archive Collection, along with Jules Dassin’s Uptight (1968) on Blu-ray from Imprint Films.

And for you Peckinpah fans, Tim has shared his in-depth look at Sam Peckinpah’s Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), also on Blu-ray from Imprint Films.

As always, more new disc reviews are on the way for tomorrow and all next week, so be sure to watch for them. [Read on here...]

Published in My Two Cents

We’re starting our first big news update of the week here at The Bits with some new disc reviews, as always. So now available for your reading enjoyment are...

Stephen’s in-depth reviews of both the wide release 4K Ultra HD and the Disney Movie Club-exclusive “quad” 4K Ultra HD release of Walt Disney’s classic animated Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937). The good news is that Disney’s positive change in direction with 4K catalog releases is officially no fluke—the disc features absolutely beautiful 35mm film remastering with lovely grain structure and wonderfully vibrant colors.

Stephen has also turned in a review of Michael Cimino’s Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (1974) in 4K Ultra HD from Kino Lorber Studio Classics, which also features terrific new remastering.

And Stuart has delivered a look at Norman Taurog’s Spinout (1966) on Blu-ray from our friends at the Warner Archive Collection.

As always, more new reviews are on the way later this week, so be sure to watch for them.

Now then... in announcement news today, the Criterion Collection has officially revealed their January 2024 release slate. [Read on here...]

Published in My Two Cents

All right, today’s update is going to be brief, because of a couple factors. First, I’m talking with a number of sources about some forthcoming and exciting 4K Ultra HD catalog titles, which I’ll talk about here when I can. Second, I’m dealing with replacing my recently defunct Epson 5040ub projector. And more on that soon as well.

In the meantime, we have some very exciting 4K Ultra HD news today that I know a lot of you will be pleased about. And of course, we have more new disc reviews for you as well. So let’s start with those first...

Stephen has posted his thoughts on Warner’s long-awaited 4K Ultra HD release of Eric Radomski and Bruce W. Timm’s animated Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (1993)! And it appears the title has been worth the wait.

Stuart has also weighed in with a look at Robert Mulligan’s The Spiral Road (1962) on Blu-ray from Imprint Films and Via Vision Entertainment.

Dennis has offered his two cents on Jacques Tourneur’s Wichita (1955) on Blu-ray from the Warner Archive Collection, as well as Charlotte Le Bon’s Falcon Lake (2022) on Blu-ray from Vinegar Syndrome.

And last but not least, Tim has shared a review of Luca Bercovici’s Ghoulies (1985) in 4K Ultra HD from the MVD Rewind Collection, as well as Ray Kellogg’s The Giant Gila Monster (1959) and The Killer Shrews (1959) in a new double-feature Blu-ray release from Film Masters.

More disc reviews are forthcoming, so be sure to stay tuned for them. Now then, let’s get to the big release news... [Read on here...]

Published in My Two Cents

Greeting, Bits-ers! Sorry I’ve been a little MIA here this week. I’ve had a couple unexpected things happening here over the last few days, not the least of which is that my longtime workhorse home theater projector—an Epson 5040UB—decided to die unexpectedly. It appears to be a problem with the mainboard, so I find myself in the position of either having to repair it (which I’m currently investigating) or replacing it (which I’m also researching). If I go with the latter option, it will almost certainly be one of the new JVC models, which I’ve been hearing raves about for a while now. But of course, given the challenges and expenses of running a website in the 21st century—especially at a time when everyone else seems to be publishing everything they do on the wildly passive-aggressive, unvetted information vortex that is social media—suffice it to say that equipment failure was not on my 2022 budgetary Bingo card.

In any case, while I deal with that, I’ve just gotten not only Prey 4K and Loki: The Complete First Season 4K for review, and I’ve already launched into work on a review of the former using my flat panel. So look for that to be posted very soon.

Also today, our very own Stuart Galbraith IV has just chimed in with a review of Imprint’s excellent new Film Focus: Gene Hackman box set, which includes I Never Sang for My Father (1970), Bite the Bullet (1975), March or Die (1977), and The Domino Principle (1977) all on Blu-ray. Enjoy! [Read on here...]

Published in My Two Cents

Today’s new disc reviews here at The Bits include the following...

Stephen’s in-depth look at Howard Hawks’ Rio Bravo (1959), which is now available in 4K Ultra HD from Warner Bros. Discovery Home Entertainment.

And Stuart’s thoughts on Lesley Selander’s The Catman of Paris (1946) and John Ford’s The Long Voyage Home (1940), both available on Blu-ray from Via Vision’s Imprint Films label, as well as the documentary double feature Filmmakers for the Prosecution (2021) and Nuremberg: Its Lesson for Today (1948) on DVD from Kino Lorber.

Now then, we have some great 4K Ultra HD news today... Lionsgate has just set Stephen King’s The Mist for release on the format on 10/3, in both wide-release (SRP $34.99) and Best Buy-exclusive Steelbook ($37.99) versions! Each is a 4-disc set. Both the original and alternate black and white versions will be included in 4K, along with audio commentary by director Frank Darabont and producer Denise Huth. The package will also include Blu-ray versions that add deleted scenes, A Conversation with Stephen King and Frank Darabont, and other legacy extras. You can see the cover art at left and also below. Note that the 4Ks will include both HDR10 and Dolby Vision high dynamic range, as well as Dolby Atmos audio (with Dolby TrueHD found on the Blu-ray). [Read on here...]

Published in My Two Cents

Today’s post is a quick one, but we do have some great release news for you...

First, Warner Bros. Discovery Home Entertainment and DC Studios have kicked off pre-orders for their long-awaited 4K Ultra HD release of Bruce Timm and Eric Radomski’s animated Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (1993). As we’ve been expecting, the street date will be 9/12. Look for HDR10 high dynamic range and 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio. The only extra will be the existing Kevin Conroy: I Am the Knight featurette. But you can see the final cover artwork at left and also below.

By the way, we’ve also confirmed with WB that their forthcoming Babylon 5: The Complete Series Blu-ray set will include its episodes in the original 1.33 broadcast aspect ratio with 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio sound mixes. You can pre-order this title now on Amazon.com by clicking here (or on the cover art below the break).

In terms of official announcements today, our friends over at Powerhouse Films in the UK have just revealed their next pair of Indicator 4K and Blu-ray titles, which are coming on 10/24 in both the US and UK. Look for Jean Rollin’s Lips of Blood (1975) and Fascination (1979). Each will feature new 4K restorations from the original camera negative, with Dolby Vision HDR on the UHD SKUs. Each will also include a plethora of new and archival special features. Note that they’re also region free. [Read on here...]

Published in My Two Cents

We have three more new disc reviews of you today, including...

Stephen’s take on Ridley Scott’s Thelma & Louise (1991) on 4K Ultra HD from the Criterion Collection.

Tim’s look at Peyton’s Reed’s Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania (2023) on 4K Ultra HD from Marvel Studios and Disney.

And Stuart’s take on Imprint’s Tales of Adventure: Collection 1 on Blu-ray, which includes John Rawlins’ Arabian Nights (1942), Alfred E. Green’s A Thousand and One Nights (1945), Fred de Cordova’s The Desert Hawk (1950), Terence Young’s Zarak (1956), and William Dieterle’s Omar Khayyam (1957).

All three titles are well worth your time, so do give the reviews a look and enjoy!

Now then, the main piece of announcement news today is that Disney has officially set their live-action The Little Mermaid (2023) for release on Blu-ray, DVD, and 4K Ultra HD on 9/19, with the Digital release dropping on 7/25. Here’s the catch though: The physical 4K release will only be available in retail-exclusive SKUs, including one at Best Buy (in Steelbook packaging), one at Walmart (packed with a collectible pin), and the other at the Disney Movie Club (with a lithograph). The 4K UHD release will include Dolby Atmos audio, while the Blu-ray will have 7.1 DTS-HD Master Audio. [Read on here...]

Published in My Two Cents
Page 1 of 6